July 16, 2020

RUSTIC PLUM AND APPLE PIE


I hadn't made one of these in a while but I had a pack of ready made, ready rolled pastry in stock.  I fancied a fruit pie for pudding.
 
 
This kind of pastry comes supplied as an oblong in the UK, which is great for an oblong tart or quiche but not easy to use for a double crust pie in a round pie dish.  I then remembered this recipe for an open kind of pie, sometimes called a galette.  (Although to me a galette in France is a kind of savoury filled pancake made with buckwheat flour.)
 
You don't really need a recipe as such for this, just a guide. 
 
It's a sheet of ready made shortcrust pastry, placed on a baking sheet lined with baking paper and topped with two apples, peeled and sliced, three plums and a couple of nectarines, stoned and sliced. 
Scatter the fruit evenly over the pastry leaving about a 2" margin all the way round. 
Sprinkle with a couple of tablespoons of sugar (I used demerara) and fold the pastry over the fruit, pleating the edges so they stick together to form an almost complete lid.
Brush the pastry with milk and sprinkle with another tablespoon of sugar.
Bake at 200C / 180 fan for 30-40 minutes until the pastry is golden brown and the fruit cooked and bubbling slightly.
 
Delicious served warm or cool with whatever you fancy - custard, ice cream, cream, crème fraîche.

8 comments:

  1. A galette is anything sort of round and rustic. As it happens, we've just had galettes complete (buckwheat crepes with ham, egg and cheese) for lunch. I made melon ice cream yesterday so that's for dessert.

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    1. Susan, we love galettes, the ones you can buy in the supermarkets unfilled are excellent for a quick and easy lunch.
      We did try some ready filled ones once but were disappointed - not enough filling!

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  2. Perfect fruity treat for the summer. I remember years ago being very puzzled in Brittany when crepes, shortbread and a sort of potato rosti were all called galettes. So anything vaguely flat and round seems to qualify as a galette, sometimes even though it's not food.

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    1. Phil, now you have reminded me of my very favourite biscuits. Galettes St Sauveur made by Lu. Thank goodness we will be back in France next week.....in the meantime I shall have to eat the remaing few of my second favourite biscuits, those jammy dodgers from Ikea!

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  3. "You don't really need a recipe as such for this, just a guide."

    Ha-ha and double ha-ha. You cannot conceive how discouraging such statements are to us amateurs. And here's another: "It will only take a few minutes." And another: "Just make it up with what you've got on your shelves and in your fridge."

    I refer you to the principle of the superhetereodyne receiver, at the heart of all radios. You see it's just this simple oscillatory circuit which operates in conjunction with the incoming weak signal in the antenna. Peanuts, in fact, compared with the Foster-Seeley discriminator.

    I jest, of course. Or, as the French more stylishly put it, Je plaisante. Since I always believe in: when you've got it, flaunt it.

    Chapeau! Yes, I'm just back from there as you may guess.

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    1. Roderick, anyone who needs to learn how to cook will find much better places than this blog! It's a sharing of my triumphs and disasters as an enthusiast, not any kind of manual on the subject!

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  4. Just teasing. But you must realise I'm a leftie grumbler and, as an anti-monarchist, I cannot therefore support the Marie Antoinette view (said to be apocryphal) of the delicious items you describe.

    So you are (or were) just off; we're just back. France proved to be healthier and more rigorous regarding The Plague than Britain. And life in a big rented villa kept us away from crowds. Do you have a pool? At average temperatures of 34 deg C we found it essential.

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    1. Roderick, sadly no, we don't have a pool. I wish we did but our house is more a crumbling farmhouse than a villa! We find ways of enduring the heat of July and August although usually that involves spending most of it back in the UK! We wouldn't normally choose to arrive in the hottest months but in this strange year we are just so glad to be here at all.

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Your comment is the icing on the cake!